THOMAS K FLOWERS Deer Farm, Garland

2 April 2018 23:19 น. news

Thomas K. Flowers was born in Wilson County, Tennessee, December 25, 1840. He was one of the pioneers of Dallas County, Texas, arriving in the Rowlett area during the 1870’s.

T K & Martha Hamilton Flowers

T K & Martha Hamilton Flowers

His father, Joseph Flowers, also a native of Tennessee, was born in Rutherford County. Joseph drowned on July 4, 1848, at the age of thirty-seven years of age. The mother of Thomas K. was Cynthia Lannom Flowers. She was born on May 23, 1811, and died in November of 1869.

It was in 1859, while in Tennessee, that Thomas K. married Susan B. Mullins. Susan, the daughter of Thomas Mullins, was born on May 24, 1843. She came to Texas with Thomas and died near the Red River on May 29, 1873.

Their children were Udorah “Dora” who married Robert N. Merritt; Joseph T. who married Sarah Elizabeth Nelson; Laura who married W. D. Ragsdale, and infant Willie Flowers.

Mr. Flowers rented land on the Red River for seven years after arriving in Texas. He then bought 200 acres of land north of Rowlett near the present day Annie Keely School. Their house was right off the main road from Liberty to Pleasant Valley.  This road is no longer there, but their land would be about where the Waterview Golf Club is now located.

He celebrated his second marriage with Martha J. (Hamilton) Harbin, who was born April 10, 1844. Martha came to Texas in 1854, at the age of ten. The Indians were numerous and troublesome then, and it was with great difficulty that the early settlers protected their families and property. Martha’s father, Thomas, served all thru the Mexican War.

Children of Thomas K. and Martha were: Nina A. who married Bill Pelton; Beulah who married Robert Lannom; Willie who married George Carlisle; infant Mattie; Mora Lee who married John Tinsley, and James “Jim” Flowers. His daughter, Willie Flowers Carlisle was well know for the book she published in 1948 entitled Old Cemeteries of Dallas County. Very few copies of her book can still be found, however the Central Library in downtown Dallas has managed to keep a copy locked in their vault room.

The Garland News reported in 1909 that T. K. Flowers had moved to Corpus Christi last summer, where he thought his health would be better and he could spend his declining years more pleasantly. He had caught a lot of minnows Friday afternoon with the intention of going fishing early Saturday morning. His daughter, Mrs. John Tinsley, awakened about day light to get breakfast, and not finding the fire started went into Mr. Flower’s room and found him dead, life having been extinct for probably several minutes.

Physicians were called, but pronounced him beyond the help of human aid. The newspaper also reported that Grandma Flowers was visiting her children around Garland at the time and was prostrated by the news of her husband’s sudden taking off.

Mrs. Tinsley and Jim, the two youngest children, were the only members of the family at home. Uncle Tom Flowers (T. K.) was born in Tennessee on December 25, 1840 and served four years in the Confederate army, where he had the reputation of going anywhere he was ordered, marching as far as any of his comrades and complaining of hardships less than the average soldier.
Mr. Flowers was a Democrat and a member of the Knight of Honor Lodge number 2756. He was also a charter member of the Dallas County Pioneer Association which was founded in 1875 and member of the Dallas Hunting and Fishing Club which was the first country club in Dallas County and the state of Texas.

He died April 30, 1910.  Physicians were called, but pronounced him beyond the help of human aid. The newspaper also reported that Grandma Flowers was visiting her children around Garland at the time and was prostrated by the news of her husband’s sudden taking off.

Mrs. Tinsley and Jim, the two youngest children, were the only members of the family at home. Uncle Tom Flowers (T. K.) was born in Tennessee on December 25, 1840 and served four years in the Confederate army, where he had the reputation of going anywhere he was ordered, marching as far as any of his comrades and complaining of hardships less than the average soldier.

This 1900 photo shows T. K. and Martha Jane Hamilton Harbin Flowers feeding peanut vines to their pet deer.  The farm was located at First Street and Avenue D in Garland.  Original photo from Louise Merritt also appeared in the Dallas Morning News Friday, Sept. 29, 1995.  Additional information courtesy old clippings from Garland News.  T. K. Flowers was the great- great- grandfather of Jim Foster.