NEW MODEL T FORD by Pat Housewright

We made a good cotton crop and had so much money I didn’t know what to do with all of it. So I took the old 1914 Model T. Ford and traded it for a brand new 1924 Model T. Ford. We thought we were sitting on top of the world. I will tell you a lot about that Ford a few years later but right now I will tell a few more things that happened to some of the children. Kenneth got up one morning and said his nose was sore so Lucy was washing his face and he throwed his head back and she saw something in his nose. It was a grain of corn and it had been in his nose so long that it was swelled so bad we had to take him to the doctor and let him take it out. He got his nose back to normal. Lucy had a lot of trouble with Don. He would soil his pants and she tried to break him but everything failed. So finally she told him if it happened again she was going to put him down in the storm house and sure enough it happened again. She started to put him in it and she had her hands full. He was screaming and kicking but she finally got him down it and closed the door and that broke him.
 
But if it wasn’t one thing it was something else. One day Mr. Charley Seabourn’s boys, Mut, came down to our house eating an apple and Edith asked him where he got it. He said his Granny Seabourn bought a whole bushel and he said why don’t you go up there and get you one. So Edith goes up and tells Granny that Mama said for her to give Edith an apple and she did. Edith came back to the house eating the apple and Lucy ask her where did she get it and she said I told Granny that you said for her to give me an apple and she did. Lucy said, “Young lady you march right back up there and tell Granny you lied to her, that I didn’t tell you that.” She went back up there just crying and Granny said she was crying so she couldn’t hardly understand what she was saying and that done more good than a whipping.
 
So one time there was a carnival came to Wylie and we were planning to go. Don got on this mule and the mule throwed him off and I guess he landed on his head. We all went on to town and Don got to talking awful strange and we took him to the doctor. The doctor said to keep him awake for a few hours so we went back out to the carnival. After a while, we went home and put him to bed and do you know when he got up the next morning he couldn’t remember ever going to that carnival.
 
One time they were going to put on a school play at the Branch school house and we went. Barto Seabourn had a T Model Ford car and he went. Opal and Edith rode with him and after the play was over we started home and the lights went out on Barto’s car. I told him to follow behind my car and maybe we could make it home. So everything went fine until we got right out north of town and we came around a corner and Lucy looked back and said that there was something wrong for she couldn’t see them. We turned around and went back and there they were in the ditch and the car bottom side up. Barto was dragging Opal out from under the car and my lights was shining in her face. She was bleeding from her nose and was pale as death and Edith was sitting up on the bank screaming to the top of her voice. Barto asked her was she hurt and she said no and Barto said well then shut your mouth. We took Opal to Dr. Maynard and he said he couldn’t find any bones broke and thought she would be all right. We went home then. Me and my boys and Mr. Charlie Seabourn and his boys had to go and get Barto’s car out of the ditch and pull it home.
Well, here it is another sad day for us. My sister passed away on Dec. 20, 1926 and she left two boys and one girl and her husband Ernest White. One of the boy’s name was Paul and the other one was Jeff and the girl’s name was Mildred. After a little over one year Ernest married Martha Carr and they moved out to West Texas. She died while they were living out there so they moved back here. All the children grew up and married. Jeff moved to Caddo, Oklahoma. His Dad, Ernest, went up to visit with them and got up one morning and ate his breakfast. He was cold and he went in the fire room and never did sit down. He had a heart attack and fell over dead. So now his son, Paul, is in California and Mildred is living up around Blue Ridge.
 
Well, this is 1927 and on the morning of the 9th of May Nevada was blowed away. We cranked up that ole model T Ford and went over there. Don was four years old that day and he never forgot it. There were 15 bodies down in the basement in the Baptist church and it was the only building that was left standing where the cyclone passed through. We had a neighbor boy by the name of Jeff Hamilton and he had a girlfriend living over there. He had been to see her and he was down at the railroad station waiting to catch a train home. He said after the storm hit that the lights went out. He was trying to help all he could but it was so dark you couldn’t tell hardly where you were stepping. He stepped off in a well and threw his arms out and caught his self and he was scared to death the storm had blowed the curb in off the well.
 
This is 1928 and Mother had taken sick while she was staying with my sister Mollie and she taken worse. We brought her to our house and on September 11th, 1928, she passed away. She was totally blind the last five years she lived.
 
Now it is 1929 and my brother bought him a new 1929 Model T Ford. That summer we planned to go to Lubbock, Texas to visit my sister, Lula Eaves, and my brother, Ed, and also Ernest White and the children. When the day came for us to go Maxine was sick. My brother, Lune, and his family came on down to our house and we all sit around there until late that evening until Maxine was better. Then we took off and got to Ft. Worth about nightfall and spent a little time with Lune’s daughter. Then we drove until way in the night and stopped. We just pulled off the road right on a corner and we all layed down to sleep. If a bear should of come around that corner and came off the side I guess it would have killed us all except my brother’s wife. She said she wasn’t about to sleep out there and maybe get bit by one of them West Texas rattle snakes so she slept in the car. So I have wandered how we all rode in the cars because there were nine of my family and 6 of my brother’s. Anyway we had a nice visit and made it back home safe and sound and that was the last time I saw my brother Ed alive.
 
By Pat Housewright, Wylie, TX