JESSIE TUCKER Farm, Garland

9 February 2019 11:10 น. Featured, Rowlett ,

Jessie Fitzgerald, the third son of Kibby Kirby and Charles Masters Tucker, was born on November 6, 1870 at the home place on the present-day site one block west from Centerville Road on Castle Drive (near the Rowlett & Garland city limits). Centerville used to head north through Mills Cemetery, cross Highway 66 (the old Bankhead Highway), and then dead-end at Castle. From that point the old Tucker home place was to the left and up the hill heading west. The hill was known as Tucker Hill.

Jessie Tucker Farm, NE Dallas County

Jessie Tucker Farm, NE Dallas County

Jessie received a common education at a one-room school about where Dexham and Highway 66 cross. His brothers were William Sidney, Elihu Henderson (Dick), and Christopher Columbus (Lum).

Jessie worked on the farm with his brothers until 1890, at which time he received 200 acres of land from his parents and built a two-story ““T””-shaped house, which burned down in 1932. All four boys received 200 acres when they were twenty years old. Jessie’’s was on the southeast corner of Hickock Road and Rowlett/Pleasant Valley Road. He farmed this land and sharecropped some of his father’’s land and others.

He married Elizabeth (Bettie) Lee Cherry on January 13, 1893, and they had three boys. Jesse Clifton, born September 23, 1894, died on February 3, 1977. Newton was born in 1895, exact date not known. He was scalding hogs in the fall of 1912 when the scalding vat turned over on him and he was badly burned. He died of pneumonia as a result of the scalding, but the exact date of his death is not known, nor is his place of burial. Lloyd Glover was born January 29, 1898, and died in a car accident on September 16, 1955. He and Jesse were buried in Restland Memorial Park in Dallas.
Bettie died in childbirth October 13, 1900, and she and the baby girl were buried together at Big ““A”” Cemetery in Rowlett.

After Bettie’’s death the boys lived with their aunt and uncle, Mary Catherine and William Sidney Tucker, and Jessie would visit them every Wednesday, then he moved into a rooming house on State Street, just west of the square in Garland, and the boys moved in with him. Their grandparents, Bettie’’s parents, Mary Jane Farmer and Thomas Glover Cherry, lived one block away and the boys stayed most of the time with them until they went to high school.

Jesse and Newton graduated from Gar-land High School in 1912 and Lloyd in 1916. Jesse went to Columbia University in New York City until he was drafted in 1917. He graduated from Southwestern University in Georgetown in 1919. Lloyd was in the first class at SMU and graduated in 1922.
Jessie, Dick, Lum, and William, got together a group of people to build a one-room school on the northeast corner of Castle Drive and Rowlett-Pleasant Valley Road (now Loop 190) in Rowlett. Dick donated the land on which it was built and they named it Tuckerville School. Some of the families who helped build the school were the Garrisons, Joneses, Comptons, Morrisons, Hugheses, Presewoods, McCullums, Armstrongs, Shugarts, Peltons, and Copelands. It opened in 1907.

Jessie Fitzgerald Tucker married Anna Lee Scoggins on March 12, 1908, and they set up housekeeping on a farm on the Bankhead Highway (now Highway 66), just east of the square in Garland. He has been identified as a farmer and business-man; his moved in with him. Their grandparents, Bettie’’s parents, Mary Jane Farmer and Thomas Glover Cherry, lived one block away and the boys stayed most of the time with them until they went to high school.

Jesse and Newton graduated from Gar-land High School in 1912 and Lloyd in 1916. Jesse went to Columbia University in New York City until he was drafted in 1917. He graduated from Southwestern University in Georgetown in 1919. Lloyd was in the first class at SMU and graduated in 1922.
Jessie, Dick, Lum, and William, got together a group of people to build a one-room school on the northeast corner of Castle Drive and Rowlett-Pleasant Valley Road (now Loop 190) in Rowlett. Dick donated the land on which it was built and they named it Tuckerville School. Some of the families who helped build the school were the Garrisons, Joneses, Comptons, Morrisons, Hugheses, Presewoods, McCul-lums, Armstrongs, Shugarts, Peltons, and Copelands. It opened in 1907.

Jessie Fitzgerald Tucker married Anna Lee Scoggins on March 12, 1908, and they set up housekeeping on a farm on the Bankhead Highway (now Highway 66), just east of the square in Garland. He has been identified as a farmer and businessman; his various interests were in farming, cattle, real estate, banking, a hardware store, cotton and onion brokerage.

He and his brother, Dick, ran a steer operation on the ranch in Limestone Gap, Oklahoma, from about 1896 to 1914. They would stock from 200 to 400 head of steers on the ranch for two years and then ship them to Kansas City. The ranch is located south of the Canadian River and west of present day Highway 75. When last seen in 1988, the cattle pens were still in existence. He and Dick also furnished teams of mules to build White Rock Lake, 1910 to 1911.

In 1911 Jessie formed a bank in Garland, of which he was the first president, called Guaranty State Bank. In 1912 it merged with National Bank and became State National Bank of Garland. He and H.H. Jones formed a partnership and established the first hardware store in Garland, Garland Hardware, in 1918. In 1926 Jessie sold his interest to Haskell Roach. In 1917-1918 he fed cattle for the Army on the east shore of what is now Lake Ray Hubbard, just south of Highway 66.

His real estate office was on the southwest corner of Main and Austin in Garland from 1912 to 1940. He also had a cotton brokerage office from 1927 to 1944, located on the northeast corner of State Street at Garland Square.
In the late 1920s to 1945 Jessie had an on-ion brokerage company. He bought and sold onions all over the United States. The Katy Railroad built an onion platform so they could secure a shipping contract from Jessie. It was on the north end of Austin Street across from the railroad tracks. The onion brokerage lasted about ninety days and the cotton brokerage about six months annually.

In 1927 Jessie was in a partnership, which formed the Liberty Land bank. They purchased land in the Liberty Grove community and kept 400+ acres until Jessie’’s death in 1945. The present location is north and south of Yeager on the west and east side of the road.

In 1942 a soon-to-be-famous golfer was born on the farm on Hickock Road in Rowlett, named Lee Trevino. Lee tells the story that when the cotton and onion harvests were over, Jessie had his (Lee’’s) grandfather and uncle go to the Rowlett creek bottoms and cut cord wood and stack it for $1 per cord. Lee said that was to keep them working during the winter and that most of the wood was left in the stack and he believed that this was just Jessie’’s way of keeping the Trevinos in food for the winter. Jessie and Anna Lee helped many families during the Depression with food and clothing. He also was a big supporter of the annual Tucker Family reunion. The tradition was that everyone brought something to eat, which was spread out for the feast. Jessie always furnished barbecued goat. For several years the gathering was at the Pleasant Valley Methodist Church, which he had joined in 1923. Later it was moved to Tenison Park, then to Williams Park (now called Central Park) in Garland. As of this date, the annual gathering is still going on.

He was a great sportsman; he hunted on Ridgeway Ranch in Kerr County for forty plus years with the same group of people. He even renewed his hunting license in 1945, the year of his death. He also loved to play dominoes and would play at the filling station on the southwest corner of Main and Commerce in Rowlett and in Pleasant Valley at the grocery store on the northeast corner of Pleasant Valley Road and Merritt Road. They still play there every Saturday.

Jessie died at home on November 26, 1945 and is buried at Restland Memorial Park in the Tower Section next to Anna Lee.

One thing my grandfather, Jessie Fitzgerald Tucker, always told me was to always keep your word, even if it was not written down.

By Martha J Gracy for Proud Heritage, Volume III by Dallas County Pioneer Association.