Dallas

DALLAS MAYOR HENRY S. ERVAY

15 December 2018

Henry S. Ervay, the Reconstruction mayor, became a hero in Dallas.  He was born in 1834 in Elmira, New York. He was the oldest in a large family of ten children and grew up on his parents‘ farm in Mercer County, Pennsylvania.  Henry moved to Texas in 1858 at the age of 24  where he […]

MOSE IRALSON, Dallas Jewish Merchant

30 November 2018

This amazingly clear 1892 photo of Mose Iralson was taken at the studio of Clifton Church. Almost no trace of Mose Iralson, or his family remain in Dallas history. However, a story in the May 24, 1893 edition of the Daily Times Hearald list M. Iralson and company as being in the manufacturer of millinery […]

G. C. EDWARDS Backed Speech Freedom

29 November 2018

GEORGE CLIFTON EDWARDS, a pioneer liberal on political issues and the town’s most indefatigable fighter for free speech, remains a vivid and engaging figure in the memories of countless numbers of the generation that knew him personally. Born in Dallas in 1878, Edwards came of substantial, even aristocratic stock. He was the third of five […]

JESSE JONES Attended Cumberland Hill

25 November 2018

THE LATE JESSE JONES, Houston capitalist and publisher who headed the Reconstruction Finance Corporation and became secretary of commerce during World War II, was among the earliest pupils enrolling in Dallas’s historic Cumberland Hill School. As a nine-year-old boy, Jones transferred to Dallas from rural schools in his native Tennessee.  He entered the third grade […]

DALLAS FARMER’S MARKET Development

7 November 2018

John Neely Bryan came to Dallas in the 1840s with the intention of establishing a trading post with the Indians. He picked the site for his first home near the Trinity River that had shale for a hard water crossing—now near the current Triple Underpass. He was aware of other towns in the United States […]

EUGENE MARSHALL, Recalls Early Street

30 October 2018

“On July 23, 1864, the ship Bellone, that had set sail from Antwerp, Belgium docked in the Boston Harbor. On the ship was a 21-year-old, registered as a farmer from Hanover, Germany. His name was Carl Ernst Friedrich (Fritz) Miltner, born in Celle, Germany. Fritz was my great-grandfather,” according to Eugene Marshall. “Fritz accepted a […]

RUDOLPH & ERMA EISENLOHR

21 October 2018

The date was December 3, 1874 when the Texas & Pacific train pulled into the Dallas station. Among the passengers arriving were Rudolph F. Eisenlohr, a 28-year-old pharmacist from Cincinnati, Ohio, his wife Erma, and two year old son, Eddie. This was not Rudolph’s first trip to Texas. In 1850, at the age of four, […]

TOM THUMB, Dallas TX Origins

20 October 2018

In 1903, Ashley W. Cullum had a small retail grocery store in downtown Dallas, and deliveries were made by horse and wagon. Then in 1919, Ashley and son Marvin organized the A. W. Cullum Wholesale Grocery Company, and it prospered through the “Great Depression” and World War II. In the late 1940s Ashley’s younger sons, […]

CALVIN LOW & Ina Rylie Family, 1914

18 October 2018

According to his death certificate, Calvin C. Low was born in Indiana on August 15, 1863. The story goes that he and his parents were traveling by covered wagon when both parents died of a fever, and Calvin was raised by Indians. We don’t know if he had any brothers or sisters, since little Calvin […]

PRESIDENT KENNEDY’S Bronze Coffin

15 October 2018

George “Bill” Mitchell spent some time visiting with me while on a short trip to Dallas last week. I reminded him that the anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination would be here soon and that it would fall on Thanks Giving Day this year. Without hesitation, Bill responded, “That’s right. I was in mortuary school back […]

J. R. COLE Opened 1889 School

5 October 2018

JAMES REID COLE, one of the noted educators of Texas and the South, came to Dallas in 1889 as the founder and president of a “Classical and Military school” which came to be known as the Cole School. Invited by a number of leading citizens to open his private school here, Cole conducted it for […]

LARGENT PARKS Recalls Chalk Hill

3 October 2018

My name is Largent Parks, maybe we’d better say Largent Parks, Senior, since there is now a Junior, and also a Third. I was born in 1907 at 4321 Swiss Avenue, which is the block between Peak and Carroll. My father had just built a large frame, two-story house with great rambling porches all around […]

UNION STATION Occupies Sala Homeplace

2 October 2018

“I have called Dallas my home since 1870,” said B. F. Sala, 2502 Parnell street. “My father, who was in the theater business, left Galveston in 1869 and followed the terminus of the Houston & Texas Central Railroad from place to place until it reached Corsicana, and on the way, built opera houses at Navasota, […]

LOUISE BUHRER, WW II Nurse’s Aide

1 October 2018

I Was A Nurse’s Aide During World War II.  My father, Herman H. Buhrer, owned the Live Oak Dairy in south Dallas, but had sold it just before war broke out on December 7, 1941. He and my mother, Julia, then purchased a farm in Richardson and moved there. I had been living at home, […]

CPL. ALBERT MILLS, MIA 68 Years Returned

30 September 2018

Terrilyn Cade Krieter reports her family received word yesterday that, after 68 years, her Uncle Albert F. “Buddy” Mills (20), who was Missing In Action in Korea is finally coming home. She says that a positive ID was made this past July and her family met with the Army yesterday for updated details. The family […]

OAK LAWN’S Early Years

24 September 2018

If one kind of tree were accorded primacy in Dallas history, it would probably be the oak. That seems to be the case, judging by the persistent popularity of the oak tree in neighborhood and street names, including Oak Cliff, Oak Lawn, Oak Grove, Oak Crest, Oak Hill, Oak Park, and such major thoroughfares as […]

CEMENT CITY Changed West Dallas

24 September 2018

Cement City was not even a thought when the Horton family came from Missouri in 1844, and received several Peters Colony land grants. They settled near the West Fork of the Trinity River, Eagle Mountain Lake, Chalk Hill, and Eagle Ford. There James Horton farmed and had a grist mill. Sarah Horton married Alexander Cockrell, […]

DALLAS PIG STANDS Quietly Vanished

14 September 2018

There was once a Pig Stand in every part of town. Before the War, the Woodrow kids congregated at the Gaston Avenue Pig Stand out on Garland Road where Gaston ended. That is, when they decided not to go congregate at Sammy’s on Greenville Avenue. The kids from North Dallas had their Pig Stand on […]

SANGER Brothers Last Early Dallas Business

3 September 2018

“Sanger Bros.’ and L. Wagner’s stores are the only mercantile establishments still in business at their old stands that were here when I landed in Dallas in November, 1880, and Judge Robert B. Seay and Judge Charles F. Clint are the only lawyers still in the practice who were here at that time,” said Max […]

DALLAS, LARGE, CRUDE TOWN, 1880

2 September 2018

 “Dallas was little more than a crude big town when I arrived here in October, 1880,” said Dean S. Arnold, captain of the police department.  The business district of Dallas was confined to Main and Elm streets, west of Akard, while the business part of East Dallas consisted of a group of stores and shops […]